Team ViGIR at DARPA Robotics Challenge

Team ViGIR is a team consisting of members from Virginia Tech, Technische Universität Darmstadt and TORC.

darpa DRC scenario

They will be taking part in Track B in the DARPA Robotics Challenge where they will use the PETMAN instead of developing their own robot. The task are shown in the chart above. TORC Robotics will take the lead developing the algorithms required for the humanoid to perform during the competition.

TORC has developed autonomous navigation kits for vehicles and they develop components for autonomous vehicles. Teleoperation with autonomy of vehicles is one technology that they have that will improve the usability of PETMAN robot. TU Darmstadt‘s Simulation, Systems Optimization and Robotics group will join the team. They have developed autonomous robot team and researched in dynamic modelling and optimisation methods in simulation. Last but not the least important is the Human-Computer Interaction Group from Virginia Tech. The team consist of groups with different expertises that make them suited for Track B.

Sliding Autonomy is a buzz word that is used widely in this competition and some feel that this will make the difference between the various teams. This is important as robots are still unable to perform robustly in the given scenario. Human intervention is still required and this is allowed during this competition. This makes it interesting when some form of autonomy is given to the robot but there are of course situations human teleoperation might be more suited. It’s about striking a balance depending on the capability of the robots. In Track B, all teams will use the PETMAN which means that they can concentrate on developing algorithms and teleoperation capabilities for use with the PETMAN. This is certainly a scenario that makes more sense today, as we take the first step away from teleoperating “dumb” robots. Heaphy Robotics was an initiative by Willow Garage a while back (watch video below) that allowed people from around the world to gain control of the PR2 to perform task without their premises. As seen in the video, you could either take full manual control over the robot or allow the robot some form of autonomy. That’s a good example of sliding autonomy.

 

Team Steel at DARPA Robotics Challenge

DARPA Robotics Challenge is the next grand challenge that’s really getting most of the robotics community on their toes. The goal of this program is to develop ground robots that are able to operate in degraded human-engineered environments performing complex task such as opening a valve, climb a ladder or even drive a car. This is in response to the difficulties faced by robots deployed during the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear incident. That revealed a lot about the current capabilities of the robots in the market today. It’s not that the robots are incapable but it’s a matter about using the wrong tool for the job.

Team Steel, led by Christopher Atkeson, is one of the two CMU teams taking part in the DARPA Robotics Challenge. They have selected to take part in Track B (using a DARPA-provided robot, the PETMAN) while their counterparts (TARTAN RESCUE, lead by Tony Stentz)  have chosen to take part in track A where members of that team will develop a robot of their own.

 

They have worked on the Sarcos Humanoid Robot, a robot similar to the PETMAN. They will implement some learning methods and interesting techniques for their robot. This will definitely be beneficial to the other team given CMU has fielded 2 teams in this competition.

 

Nao Climb Spiral Stair Autonomously

It’s always wonderful to see a humanoid conquering stairs, especially autonomously. It’s not easy on larger robots but more possible with the nao. It’s all preprogrammed without feedback with ASIMO and HUBO.

It would be wonderful to see this work on larger robots. Humanoids are built to conquer the human-centric world but seem to struggle with what we deem trivial like climbing stairs.

 

Source – robots dreams

Robot patented by Samsung

This is the first i have seen of a patent of an entire robot by samsung.

 The filings have a robot more directly mimicking a human walk and adjusting the scale to get the appropriate speed without the unnatural, perpetually bent gait of certain peers. To safely get from point A to point B, any path is chopped up into a series of walking motions, and the robot constantly checks against its center of gravity to stay upright as it walks uphill or down.

Source – Engadget

HUBO 2 is for sale and Singapore has 2!

HUBO is a humanoid from Korea, specifically from KAIST. It’s one of the most advance humanoid robot for sale and it’s price tag is $400k. There are currently 6 in USA and 2 in Singapore. There are orders for 3 in Korea and China.

Professor Oh, the creator of HUBO, shared that he wants a community to develop on HUBO. It will one day be a standard robot that will be used for development in the world.

Read the following article to find out more.

The Humanoid Grand Challenge [DARPA] is Finally Here!

This is a long awaited competition for robotics is here. This should hopefully drive research in this field. Many humanoids have always been showed in staged environments given the difficulties in getting them to perform in the real world.

There are many difficulties that has to be overcomed but actuator design. Dr. Gill Pratt, DARPA’s program director, is in-charge of this challenge. He is familiar with this field, given he is the inventor of the Series Elastic Actuator at MIT where he was developing robots for locomotion. He’s the right person to drive this development.

Here’s a good article about actuators used in legged robots.

There has been many advancement in using traditional electric servo motor solutions to locomotion. Petman at Boston Dynamics and DLR with their Bipedal Robot.

Robocup has a similar goal in development of humanoids as well.

By mid-21st century, a team of fully autonomous humanoid robot soccer players shall win the soccer game, comply with the official rule of the FIFA, against the winner of the most recent World Cup.

[source: robocup.org]

Link to the announcement at Hizook and Wired.