Team ViGIR at DARPA Robotics Challenge

Team ViGIR is a team consisting of members from Virginia Tech, Technische Universität Darmstadt and TORC.

darpa DRC scenario

They will be taking part in Track B in the DARPA Robotics Challenge where they will use the PETMAN instead of developing their own robot. The task are shown in the chart above. TORC Robotics will take the lead developing the algorithms required for the humanoid to perform during the competition.

TORC has developed autonomous navigation kits for vehicles and they develop components for autonomous vehicles. Teleoperation with autonomy of vehicles is one technology that they have that will improve the usability of PETMAN robot. TU Darmstadt‘s Simulation, Systems Optimization and Robotics group will join the team. They have developed autonomous robot team and researched in dynamic modelling and optimisation methods in simulation. Last but not the least important is the Human-Computer Interaction Group from Virginia Tech. The team consist of groups with different expertises that make them suited for Track B.

Sliding Autonomy is a buzz word that is used widely in this competition and some feel that this will make the difference between the various teams. This is important as robots are still unable to perform robustly in the given scenario. Human intervention is still required and this is allowed during this competition. This makes it interesting when some form of autonomy is given to the robot but there are of course situations human teleoperation might be more suited. It’s about striking a balance depending on the capability of the robots. In Track B, all teams will use the PETMAN which means that they can concentrate on developing algorithms and teleoperation capabilities for use with the PETMAN. This is certainly a scenario that makes more sense today, as we take the first step away from teleoperating “dumb” robots. Heaphy Robotics was an initiative by Willow Garage a while back (watch video below) that allowed people from around the world to gain control of the PR2 to perform task without their premises. As seen in the video, you could either take full manual control over the robot or allow the robot some form of autonomy. That’s a good example of sliding autonomy.

 

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